Stock Rover

Barron’s Electronic Investor column reviewed a site called Stock Rover. The review was compelling enough that I checked it out and registered. The interface is more like a software program than a website interface that you might be familiar with from Yahoo Finance. Below are a couple of screen shots to give some sense of what it looks like. So far I’ve looked at only a couple of things in there but it seems like there is going to be a lot of information as I get further into it. For now I have input our large portfolio into the site and looked at the charts. The portfolio portion does some interesting things along the lines of managing narrow aspects of the portfolio like the beta and the yield. It will give you dynamic yield and beta information. I’ve mentioned before the extent to which I manage these aspects of the portfolio. In the lower left hand corner of the interface is a column titled views which goes into more detail than the default on various attributes including dividends, valuation, returns versus SPX among several others–these are clickable sorts that get applied to the portfolio. You can also input multiple portfolios. The charting seems to have everything that any of the other websites have except for maybe Stockcharts.com. Stockcharts.com allows for comparing two things as a ratio such that IBM:INTC would express a comparison as a single line ratio versus the two line comparison that just about every other site has. If Stock Rover can do this it wasn’t apparent as to how to do it. While there is...

Stock Rover

Barron’s Electronic Investor column reviewed a site called Stock Rover. The review was compelling enough that I checked it out and registered. The interface is more like a software program than a website interface that you might be familiar with from Yahoo Finance. Below are a couple of screen shots to give some sense of what it looks like. So far I’ve looked at only a couple of things in there but it seems like there is going to be a lot of information as I get further into it. For now I have input our large portfolio into the site and looked at the charts. The portfolio portion does some interesting things along the lines of managing narrow aspects of the portfolio like the beta and the yield. It will give you dynamic yield and beta information. I’ve mentioned before the extent to which I manage these aspects of the portfolio. In the lower left hand corner of the interface is a column titled views which goes into more detail than the default on various attributes including dividends, valuation, returns versus SPX among several others–these are clickable sorts that get applied to the portfolio. You can also input multiple portfolios. The charting seems to have everything that any of the other websites have except for maybe Stockcharts.com. Stockcharts.com allows for comparing two things as a ratio such that IBM:INTC would express a comparison as a single line ratio versus the two line comparison that just about every other site has. If Stock Rover can do this it wasn’t apparent as to how to do it. While there is...

Sunday Morning Coffee

A reader left a comment on a post from earlier in the week that I think ties in with something that came up in my Thursday call with AdvisorShares. In his comment the reader noted that we’ve been in a bull market since the March 2009 low and that in his opinion the bull does not look long in the tooth. In the AdvisorShares call I was asked about my outlook for the rest of the year and I felt as though giving a complete answer for 2012 included something of a look ahead to 2013. Although not new for long time readers, I mentioned that if 2012 finishes up a little (or better than up a little) that will be four years with out a decline (I think of 2011 as being flat). Historically the US equity market is down one year in four so in a way if we are up in 2012 then it could be argued that we would be overdue for a down year. This is a top down concept based on how cycles have often worked in the past. There is of course no reason that 2013 can’t be up and maybe there will be several more years in a row of positive returns but this is not how things have typically worked. This sort of thing impacts portfolio decisions. There was a stretch in 2010 where the S&P 500 spent a couple of months below its 200 DMA. While I remained disciplined in terms of starting defensive action I was not aggressively defensive based on how cycles tend to work. Yes the...

Sunday Morning Coffee

A reader left a comment on a post from earlier in the week that I think ties in with something that came up in my Thursday call with AdvisorShares. In his comment the reader noted that we’ve been in a bull market since the March 2009 low and that in his opinion the bull does not look long in the tooth. In the AdvisorShares call I was asked about my outlook for the rest of the year and I felt as though giving a complete answer for 2012 included something of a look ahead to 2013. Although not new for long time readers, I mentioned that if 2012 finishes up a little (or better than up a little) that will be four years with out a decline (I think of 2011 as being flat). Historically the US equity market is down one year in four so in a way if we are up in 2012 then it could be argued that we would be overdue for a down year. This is a top down concept based on how cycles have often worked in the past. There is of course no reason that 2013 can’t be up and maybe there will be several more years in a row of positive returns but this is not how things have typically worked. This sort of thing impacts portfolio decisions. There was a stretch in 2010 where the S&P 500 spent a couple of months below its 200 DMA. While I remained disciplined in terms of starting defensive action I was not aggressively defensive based on how cycles tend to work. Yes the...

The Big Picture For the Week of April 29, 2012

I stumbled across a very important quote from Jeremy Grantham; The cardinal rule is to not underperform in bear markets. Confirmation bias being what it is I take this as a validation for some sort of objective trigger point for taking defensive action when chances for a large decline increase. Obviously at our firm we use the S&P 500 going below its 200 day moving average. There are several others that are similar like the 50 DMA crossing below the 200 DMA. I don’t think it matter too much which indicator is chosen as none of them can be the best for every market cycle. Our objective, as stated frequently, is simply to avoid the full brunt of a large decline. Top ticking the market might happen but that is less important than what Grantham states above. While things are going well it is worth pointing out that markets are cyclical there will be another large decline at some and it will scare the hell out of people such that would have seemed to have forgotten the last one. Part of the concept of defensive action is the psychological benefit of reducing the odds of seeing the portfolio drop to a point that induces panic selling. Every so often the market goes down a lot. And then it starts to work its way back. It might take years to get back to where it was or maybe not so long (Japan perhaps being the exception that proves the rule) and then it repeats. Sitting here today while things are looking pretty good, everyone would say oh, of course there...